Fat

Did you know that your brain is about 60 percent fat? The fats you eat strongly influence your level of brain function.

Some experts believe the human brain would not have developed as it did without access to high levels of DHA (a type of fat) found in fish and wild game that we ate as hunter & gatherers. As I mentioned earlier, health is about balance. In particular, we must balance our diet to meet our individual needs. Balancing Omega-3 and omega-6 fats is one such example of this balancing act. High omega-6 (found in vegetable oils like sunflower oil) and low omega-3 (found in fish oils like krill and nuts and seeds like walnuts and flaxseeds) fats can lead to profound changes in brain size and function.

Saturated Fat

Saturated fats are not as dangerous as you think. In fact, coconut oil is quite healthy and is the oil to use for cooking since it is far less likely to be damaged through heating.

A misguided fallacy that persists to this day is the belief that saturated fat will increase your risk of heart attacks. Folks, this is simply another myth that has been harming your health for the last 30 or 40 years. The truth is, healthy saturated fats from high quality minimally processed animal and vegetable sources provide a concentrated source of energy in your diet, and they provide the building blocks for cell membranes and a variety of hormones and hormone like substances.

coconut oil

When you eat saturated fats as part of your meal, they slow down absorption so that you can go longer without feeling hungry. In addition, they act as carriers for important fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K. Dietary fats are also needed for the conversion of carotene to vitamin A, for mineral absorption, and for a host of other biological processes.

It’s important though to understand that not all saturated fats are the same. There are subtle differences that have profound health implications, and if you avoid eating all saturated fats, your health will likely suffer as a result. There are in fact more than a dozen different types of saturated fat, but you predominantly consume only three: stearic acid, palmitic acid and lauric acid.

It’s already been well established that stearic acid (found in cocoa and animal fat) has no adverse effects on your cholesterol levels, and actually gets converted in your liver into the monounsaturated fat called oleic acid. The other two, palmitic and lauric acid, do raise total cholesterol. However, since they raise "good" cholesterol as much or more than "bad" cholesterol, you’re still actually lowering your risk of heart disease. Sources of healthy fats include:

  • Avacados
  • Coconut/Coconut Oil
  • Organic Butter
  • Nut oils
  • Raw Dairy
  • Raw Nuts
  • Eggs
  • Grass-Fed Meats
  • Fish/Seafood

Omega-3 fats improve your cell’s response to insulin. They are anti-inflammatory. On the other hand, omega-6 fats are pro-inflammatory and contribute to insulin and membrane resistance, altering your mood, and impairing learning and cell repair. To avoid high levels of omega-6, it is important to avoid all vegetable seed oils.

Please understand that it’s not only necessary to consciously consume omega-3 fats, but it is just as important to lower your omega-6 fat intake. If you don’t lower your omega-6 fats to acceptable levels, your omega 6:3 ratio will not be low enough, this causes another souce of Phsiological Load, and you will not receive many of the wonderful benefits of omega-3 fats such as reduced risk of heart disease, cancer, stroke, Alzheimer’s, arthritis and many other degenerative illnesses.

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